Who and What is Maranao

Area

The Maranaos primarily live in the provinces of Lanao del Sur and Lanao del Norte, and many are settlers in Zamboanga del Sur, Bukidnon, Cotabato, Maguindanao, and in many southern Philippine islands from Basilan exending to Tawi-Tawi. Small communities of Maranaos, mostly traders, can be found in all major towns of the Philippines.

Demographics

Maranaos number about 1,142,000. They are the descendants of Muslim Malays who came to the Philippines. Their royals have varied influsions of Arabic, Malayan, Indonesian, as well as Chinese blood. The Maranaos also are one of the ethnic groups in the Philippines who are fair-skinned, probably attributable to Arab and Chinese admixtures. The language of the Maranao people is also called Maranao. It is a language spoken by approximately 800,000 people living in areas near Lanao del Sur and Lanao del Norte. The language can be traced from the Southern Philippine sub-branch of the Western Austronesian language family, and is closely related to the Ilanun language spoken in Sabah and Malaysia. It is also close to Maguindanaon, the language spoken in Maguindanao, North Cotabato, South Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat, and Zamboanga del Sur provinces. The vast majority of Maranaos are Muslims. A few, especially those living in the hills around Lake Lanaopractice Islam diluted with traces of pre-Islamic traditions.

Musical Heritage

Main articles: Music of the Philippines, Kulintang

The native Maranao have a fascinating culture that revolves around kulintang music, a specific type of gong music, found among both Muslim and non-Muslim groups of the Southern Philippines. In 2005, the Darangen Epic of the Maranao people of Lake Lanao was selected by UNESCO as a Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.

History

Previous to the occupation of the Philippines by Spanish, and later American and Japanese, the Maranaos had their own kingdom with a Sultan ruler due to the influence of Muslim missionaries.

External links

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What is Maguindanao people?

History

Pre-Spanish

In the early 15th century, Sharif Muhammad Kabungsuan, an Arab-Malay preacher from the royal house of Malacca, arrived in what is now Malabang, introduced Islamic faith and customs, settled down with a local princess, and founded a sultanate whose capital was Cotabato. The other center of power in the area, Buayan, has an even longer history dating back to early Arab missionaries, who, although not able to implant the Islamic faith, introduced a more sophisticated political system. In Buayan, the transition to Islamtook a longer time. Spanish chronicles reveal that Buayan, and not Cotabato, was the most important settlement in Mindanao at that time.

Spanish times

In 1579, an expedition sent by Governor Francisco de Sande failed to conquer Maguindanao. In 1596, the Spanish government gave Captain Rodriguez de Figueroa the sole right to colonize Mindanao. He met defeat in Buayan, and later, was killed in an ambush by a Buhahayen named Ubal. His forces retreated to an anchorage near Zamboanga. The rise of the Maguindanao-Cotabato power came after the defeat of Datu Sirongan of Buayan in 1606. From 1607 to 1635, new military alliances were formed, this time with Cotabato. By the 1630s, Cotabato had become a coastal power. In the early 17th century, the largest alliance composed of the Maguindanao, Maranao, Tausug, and other Muslim groups was formed by Sultan Kudarat or Cachel Corralat of Maguindanao, whose domain extended from the Davao Gulf to Dapitan on the Zamboangapeninsula. Several expeditions sent by the Spanish authorities suffered defeat. In 1635, Captain Juan de Chaves occupied Zamboanga and erected a fort. This lead to the defeat of Kudarat’s feared admiral, Datu Tagal, who had raided pueblos in the Visayas. In 1637, Governor General Hurtado de Corcuera personally led an expedition against Kudarat, and triumphed over his forces at Lamitan and Ilian. Spanish presence was withdrawn in 1663, providing an opportunity for Kudarat to re consolidate his forces.

From 1663 to 1718, Maguindanao influence extended as far as Zambales in the west, Cagayan de Oro in the north, Sarangani in the south, and Davao in the east. In 1719, the Spaniards reestablished control with the building of the strategic Fort Pilar in Zamboanga (Miravite 1976:40; Angeles 1974:28; Darangen 1980:42-45). The 1730s saw the weakening of the Maguindanao sultanate, as it struggled with civil war and internal disunity. Spanish help was sought by the besieged rajah mudah (crown prince), further destroying the prestige of the sultanate. Thus, Cotabato power became increasingly dependent on Spanish support. This deepening compromise with Spain led Cotabato to its downfall. Fearing Buayan’s reemerging power, Sultan Kudarat II finally ceded Cotabato to Spain in return for an annual pension of 1,000 pesos for him, and 800 pesos for his son. Buayan, under Datu Uto, had, by the 1860s, become the power of Maguindanao. In 1887, General Emilio Terrero led an expedition against Uto; although, he was able to destroy the kota (forts) in Cotabato, he was unable to enforce Spanish sovereignty (Miravite 1976:42; Ileto 1971:16-29). In 1891, Governor General Valeriano Weyler personally led a campaign against the Maguindanao and Maranao. In the next few months, Weyler erected a fort in Parang-Parang, between Pulangi and the Ilanun coast. This effectively stopped the shipment of arms to Uto, who died a defeated man in 1902.

American times

During the Philippine-American War, the Americans adopted a policy of noninterference in the Muslim areas, as spelled out in the Bates Agreement of 1899 signed by Brig. General John Bates and Sultan Jamalul Kiram II of Jolo. The agreement was a mutual non-aggression pact which obligated the Americans to recognize the authority of the Sultan and other chiefs who, in turn, agreed to fight piracy and crimes against Christians. However, the Muslims did not know that the Treaty of Paris, which had ceded the Philippine archipelago to the Americans, included their land as well. After the Philippine-American War, the Americans established direct rule over the newly formed “Moro Province”, which then consisted of five district–Zamboanga, Lanao, Cotabato, Davao, and Sulu. Political, social, and economic changes were introduced. These included the creation of provincial and district institutions; the introduction of the public school system and American-inspired judicial system; the imposition of the cedula; the migration of Christians to Muslim lands encouraged by the colonial government; and the abolition of slavery. Datu Ali of Kudarangan, Cotabato refused to comply with the antislavery legislation, and revolted against the Americans. In October 1905, he and his men were killed. The Department of Mindanao and Sulu replaced the Moro province on 15 December 1913. A “policy of attraction” was introduced, ushering in reforms to encourage Muslim integration into Philippine society.

In 1916, after the passage of the Jones Law, which transferred legislative power to a Philippine Senate and House of Representatives, polygamy was made illegal. However, the Muslims were granted time to comply with the new restrictions. “Proxy colonialism” was legalized by the Public Land Act of 1919, invalidating Muslim Pusaka (inherited property) laws. The act also granted the state the right to confer land ownership. It was thought that the Muslims would “learn” from the “more advanced” Christian Filipinos, and would integrate more easily into mainstream Philippine society.

In February 1920, the Philippine Senate and House of Representatives passed Act No. 2878, which abolished the Department of Mindanao and Sulu and transferred its responsibilities to the Bureau of Non-Christian Tribes under the Department of the Interior. Muslim dissatisfaction grew as power shifted to the Christianized Filipinos; it was one thing to be administered by the militarily superior Americans, another by their traditional enemies, the Christian Filipinos. Petitions were sent by Muslim leaders in 1921 and 1924 requesting that Mindanao and Sulu be administered directly by the United States. These petitions were not granted. Isolated cases of armed resistance were quickly crushed. In Cotabato, Datu Ambang of Kidapawan attempted to incite a jihad (holy war) against the Americans and the Christian Filipinos. This, however, did not take place when the governor of the province mobilized government forces.

Realizing the futility of armed resistance, some Muslims sought to make the best of the situation. In 1934, Arolas Tulawi of Sulu, Datu Menandang Pang and Datu Blah Sinsuat of Cotabato, and Sultan Alaoya Alonto of Lanao were elected to the 1935 Constitutional Convention. In 1935, only two Muslims were elected into the National Assembly.

The Commonwealth years sought to end the privileges the Muslims had been enjoying under the earlier American administration. Muslim exemptions from some national laws, as expressed in the Administrative Code for Mindanao, and the Muslim right to use their traditional Islamic courts, as expressed in the Moro board, were ended. The Bureau of Non-Christian Tribes was replaced by the Office of the Commissioner for Mindanao and Sulu, whose main objective was to tap the full economic potentials of Mindanao not for the Muslims but for the Commonwealth. These “development” efforts resulted in discontent which found expression in the various armed uprisings, mostly in Lanao, from 1936 to 1941. The Muslims are generally adverse to anything that threatens Islam and their way of life. Che Man (1990:56) believes that they were neither anti-American nor anti-Filipino, but simply against any form of foreign encroachment into their traditional way of life. During World War II, the Muslims in general supported the fight against the Japanese, who were less tolerant and harsher to them than the American Commonwealth government.

Independent Philippines

After independence, efforts to integrate the Muslims into the new political order met with stiff resistance. It was unlikely that the Muslims, who have had longer cultural history as Muslims than the Christian Filipinos as Christian, would surrender their identity. The conflict was exacerberated in 1965 with the “Jabidah Massacre”, in which Muslim soldiers were allegedly eliminated because they refused to invade Sabah. This incident contributed to the rise of various separatist movements–the Muslim Independence Movement (MIM), Ansar el-Islam, and Union of Islamic Forces and Organizations. In 1969, the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) was founded on the concept of a Bangsa Moro Republic by a group of educated young Muslims. The leader of this group, Nur Misuari, regarded the earlier movements as feudal and oppressive, and employed a Marxist framework to analyze the Muslim condition and the general Philippine situation. In 1976, negotiations between the Philippine government and the MNLF in Tripoli resulted in the Tripoli Agreement, which provided for an autonomous region in Mindanao. Negotiations resumed in 1977, and the following points were agreed upon: the proclamation of a Presidential Decree creating autonomy in 13 provinces; the creation of a provisional government; and the holding of a referendum in the autonomous areas to determine the administration of the government. Nur Misuari was invited to chair the provisional government, but he refused. The referendum was boycotted by the Muslims themselves. The talks collapsed, and fighting continued (Che Man 1988:146-147).

When Corazon C. Aquino became president, a new constitution, which provided for the creation of autonomous regions in Mindanao and the Cordilleras, was ratified. On 1 August 1989, Republic Act 673 or the Organic Act for Mindanao created the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), which encompasses Maguindanao, Lanao del Sur, Sulu, and Tawi-Tawi.

Musical Heritage

Main articles: Music of the Philippines, Kulintang

The native Maguindanaon have a fascinating culture that revolves around kulintang music, a specific type of gong music, found among both Muslim and non-Muslim groups of the Southern Philippines.

What is tausug people

Area

The Tausugs presently populate the province of Sulu as a majority, and the propvinces of Zamboanga del Sur, Basilan, and Tawi-Tawi as minorities. There is a large population of Tausugs in the all parts of Sabah, Malaysia as they are mainly laborers.

Demographics

The Tausugs currently number about 953,000 in the Philippines. They are of the same Austronesian stock that furnished the Visayans. The Tausug speak the Tausug language. The vast majority of Tausugs are staunch Muslims. In Malaysia, they number around 300,000.

Culture

History

The history of Sulu begins with Makdum, a Muslim missionary, who arrived in Sulu in 1380. He introduced the Islamic faith and settled in Tubig Indangan, Simunul until his death. The mosque’s pillars at Tubig-Indangan which he built still stands.

In 1390, Raja Baguinda landed at Buansa and extended the missionary work of Makdum. The Muslim Arabian scholar Abu Bakr arrived in 1450, married Baguinda’s daughter, and after Baguinda’s death, became sultan, thereby introducing the sultanate as a political system. Political districts were created in Parang, Pansul, Lati, Gitung, and Luuk, each headed by a panglima or district leader.

After Abu Bakr’s death, the sultanate system had already become well established in Sulu. Before the coming of the Spaniards, the ethnic groups in Sulu–the Tausug, Samal, Yakan, and Badjao–were in varying degrees united under the Sulu sultanate, considered the most centralized -political system in the Philippines. Called the “Moro Wars,” these battles were waged intermittently from 1578 till 1898 between the Spanish colonial government and the Muslims of Mindanao.

In 1578, an expedition sent by Gov Francisco de Sande and headed by Capt Rodriguez de Figueroa began the 300-year warfare between the Tausug and the Spanish authorities. In 1579, the Spanish government gave de Figueroa the sole right to colonize Mindanao. In retaliation, the Muslims raided Visayan towns in Panay, Negros, and Cebu. These were repulsed by Spanish and Visayan forces. In the early 17th century, the largest alliance composed of the Maranao, Maguindanao, Tausug, other Muslim groups was formed by Sultan Kudarat or Cachil Corralat of Maguindanao, whose domain extended from the Davao Gulf to Dapitan on the Zamboanga peninsula. Several expeditions sent by the Spanish authorities suffered defeat. In 1635, Capt Juan de Chaves occupied Zamboanga and erected a fort. In 1637, Gov Gen Hurtado de Corcuera personally led an expedition against Kudarat, and triumphed over his forces at Lamitan and Ilian. On 1 January 1638, de Corcuera with 80 vessels and 2000 soldiers, defeated the Tausug and occupied Jolo. A peace treaty was forged. The victory did not establish Spanish sovereignty over Sulu, as the Tausug abrogated the treaty as soon Spaniards left in 1646.

In 1737, Sultan Alimud Din I entered into a “permanent” peace treaty with Gov Gen F. Valdes y Tamon; and in 1746, befriended the Jesuits sent to Jolo by King Philip V. The Tausug retaliated by raiding northern coasts. In 1893, amid succession controversies, Amirnul Kiram became Sultan Jamalul Kiram II, the title being officially recognized by the Spanish authorities. In 1899, after the defeat of Spain in the Spanish-American War, Col Luis Huerta, the last governor of Sulu, relinquished his garrison to the Americans (Orosa 1970:25-30).

During the Philippine-American War, the Americans adopted a policy of noninterference in the Muslim areas, as spelled out in the Bates Agreement of 1899 signed by Brig Gen John Bates and Sultan Jamalul Kiram II of Jolo. Although the Bates Agreement had “pacified,” to a certain extent, the Sulu sultanate, resistance continued. In 1901, panglima (district chief) Hassan and his followers fought the Americans, believing that acceptance of American sovereignty would affect his own authority (Che Man l990:46-47)

After the Philippine-American War, the Americans established direct rule over the newly formed “Moro province,” which consisted of five districts-Zamboanga, Lanao, Cotabato, Davao, and Sulu. Political, social, and economic changes were introduced. These included the creation of provincial and district institutions; the introduction of the public school system and American-inspired judicial system the imposition of the cedula or head tax; the migration of Christians to Muslim lands encouraged by the colonial government; and the abolition of slavery. These and other factors contributed to Muslim resistance that took 10 years “to pacify”. The Department of Mindanao and Sulu replaced the Moro province on 15 December 1913.

A “policy of attraction” was introduced, ushering in reforms to encourage Muslim integration into Philippine society. “Proxy colonialism” was legalized by the Public Land Act of 1919, invalidating Muslim pusaka (inherited property) laws. The act also granted the state the right to confer land ownership. It was thought that the Muslims would “learn” from the “more advanced” Christianized Filipinos, and would integrate more easily into mainstream Philippine society. In February 1920, the Philippine Senate and House of Representatives passed Act No 2878, which abolished the Department of Mindanao and Sulu and transferred its responsibilities to the Bureau of Non-Christian Tribes under the Department of the Interior. Muslim dissatisfaction grew as power shifted to the Christianized Filipinos. Petitions were sent by Muslim leaders between 1921 and 1924 requesting that Mindanao and Sulu be administered directly by the United States. These petitions were not granted. Realizing the futility of armed resistance, some Muslims sought to make the best of the situation. In 1934, Arolas Tulawi of Sulu, Datu Manandang Piang and Datu Blah Sinsuat of Cotabato, and Sultan Alaoya Alonto of Lanao were elected to the 1935 Constitutional Convention. In 1935, two Muslims were elected to the National Assembly.

The Commonwealth years sought to end the privileges the Muslims had been enjoying under the earlier American administration. Muslim exemptions from some national laws, as expressed in the administrative code for Mindanao, and the Muslim right to use their traditional Islamic courts, as expressed in the Moro Board, were ended. It was unlikely that the Muslims, who have had a longer cultural history as Muslims than the Filipinos as Christians, would surrender their identity. Fearing government-persecution, he went to the hills. On “death row,” he was finally pardoned by Pres Marcos on 11 September 1968. This incident contributed to the rise of various separatist movements-the Muslim Independence Movement (MIM), Ansar El-Islam, and Union of Islamic Forces and Organizations (Che Man 1990:74-75). In 1969, the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) was founded on the concept of a Bangsa Moro Republic by a group of educated young Muslims. In 1976, negotiations between the Philippine government and the MNLF in Tripoli resulted in the Tripoli Agreement, which provided for an autonomous region in Mindanao. Nur Misuari was invited to chair the provisional government but he refused. The referendum was boycotted by the Muslims themselves. The talks collapsed, and fighting continued. On 1 August 1989, Republic Act 673 or the Organic Act for Mindanao created the Autonomous Region of Mindanao, which encompasses Maguindanao, Lanao del Sur, Sulu, and Tawi-Tawi. Many leaders of the Abu Sayyaf, a terrorist group operating in Mindanao, are of Tausug descent. [link]

TAUSUG

TAUSUG

 

The Tausug or SULUK people are an ethnic group in the Philippines and Malaysia. The term Tausug was derived from two words tau and sug (on suluk) meaning “people of the current” referring to their homelands in the same thing , with the former being the phonetic evolution in the Philippines of the latter( the L being dropped and thus the two short U’s merging into one long U). the Tausug people in SABAH refer to themselves as Tausug but refers to their race as SULUK as documented in official documents such as birth certificates in Sabah, Malaysia the Tausug are part of the wider Moro ethnic group, who constitute the sixth largest Filipino ethnic group.

 

HISTORY

 

The history of SULU begins with Makdum, a Muslim missionary, who arrived in SULU in 1380. He introduced the Islamic faith and settled in Tubig Indangan, Simunul. Tawi-tawi until his death.

In 1390, raja Bagunda landed at Buansa and extended the missionary work of Makdum. The Arabian scholar Abu Bakr arrived in 1450, married Bagunda’s daughter, and after Bagunda’s a death, He became sultan , thereby introducing the sultanate as a political system. Political districts were created in Parang, Pansulmlati, Gitung and Luuk, each headed by a Pang lima or political leader.

 

After Abu Bakr’s death, the sultanate system had already become well- established in Sulu. Before the coming of the Spaniards, the ethnic groups in Sulu – the Tausug, Samal, Yakan, and Bajau were in varying degrees united under the Sulu sultanate , considered the most centralized political system in the Philippines.

On 1578, an expedition sent by Gov. Francisco De Sande and headed by Capt. Rodriguez De Figueroa began the 300 years warfare between the Tausug and the Spanish authorities. In 1579, the Spanish government gave De Figueroa the role right to colonize Mindanao. In retaliation, the Muslims raided Visayan towns in Panay, Negros, and Cebu. These were repulsed by Spanish and Visayans forces. In the early 17th century , the largest alliance composed if the Maranao, Maguindanao, Tausug, other Muslim groups was formed by Sultan Kudarat of Maguindanao. Several expeditions sent by the Spanish authorities suffered defeat. In 1635, Capt. Juan De Chavez occupied Zamboanga and erected a part. In 1637, Gov. Gen. Hurtado De Corcuera personally led an expedition against Kudarat, and triumphed ever his forces at Lamitan and Ilain. On January 1638, De Corcuera with 80 vessels and 2000 soldiers, defeated the Tausug and occupied Jolo. A peace treaty was forged. The victory did not establish Spanish sovereignty over SULU , as the Tausug abrogated the treaty as soon as the Spaniards left in 1646.

 

In 1737, Sultan Alimud Den I entered into a ‘permanent’ peace treaty with Gov Gen F. Valdez Y tamon, and in 1746, befriended the Jesuits sent to Jolo by King Philip.

In 1893, amed succession controversies, Amirnul Kiram became sultan Jamalul Kiram II, the title being officially recognized by the Spanish authorities. In 1899, after the defeat of Spain in the Spanish American warm col. Luis Huerta, the last Governor of SULU, relinquished his garrison to the Americans (Orosa 1970 – 25 -30)

During the Philippines – American war, the Americans adopted a policy of non-interference in the Muslim areas, as spelled out in the bates agreement of 1899 signed by Brig. Gen. John Bates and Sultan Jamalul Kiram II of Jolo.

After the Philippines – American war , the Americans established direct rules ever the newly formed “Moro province, which consisted of five districts – Zamboanga, Lana, Cotabato, Davao and Sulu. Political, social, and economic changes were introduced. These included the creation of provincial and district institutions, the introduction of the public school system and American – inspired judicial system, the imposition of the Cedula or dead tax, the migration of Christians to Muslims lands encouraged by the colonial Government, and the abolition of slavery. These and other factors contributed to Muslim resistance that took 10 years “to pacify”. The department of Mindanao and Sulu replaced the more province on 15 December 1913.

Tausug People

This article is about the people named Tausūg. For their language, see Tausug language.
Suluk redirects here. For the Islamic or Sufi term, see Sulook; for the Libyan town see Suluq.
Unbalanced scales.svg
The neutrality of this article is disputed. Please see the discussion on the talk page. Please do not remove this message until the dispute is resolved. (August 2009)

The Tausūg or Suluk people are an ethnic group of Sulu and Malaysia. The term Tausūg was derived from two words tao and sūg (or suluk) meaning “people of the current”, referring to their homelands in the Sulu Archipelago. Sūg and suluk both mean the same thing, with the former being the phonetic evolution in Sulu of the latter (the L being dropped and thus the two short U’s merging into one long U). The Tausūg people in Sabah refer to themselves as Tausūg but refers to their race as Suluk as documented in official documents such as birth certificates in Sabah, Malaysia. The Tausūg are part of the wider political identity of Muslims of Mindanao, Sulu and Palawan known as the Moro ethnic group, who constitute the third largest ethnic group of Mindanao, Sulu and Palawan.[citation needed] They originally had an independent state known as the Sulu Sultanate, which once exercised sovereignty over the present day provinces of Basilan, Palawan, Sulu, Tawi-Tawi, and the eastern part of the Malaysian state of Sabah (formerly North Borneo).

For more information take a look this website :

20 PERKARA UPKO

 

Perkara 1: AGAMA

Walaupun tiada bantahan terhadap islam menjadi agama rasmi Malaysia, agama rasmi tidak ada di borneo utara dan peruntukan berhubung dengan islam mengikut Pelembangaan Malaya hendaklah tidak merangkumi Borneo Utara.
Perkara 2: BAHASA

(a) Bahasa melayu hendaklah menjadi bahasa kebangsaan persekutuan.
(b) Bahasa inggeris akan terus digunakan untuk tempoh sepuluh tahun selepas hari Malaysia.
(c) Bahasa inggeris hendaklah menjadi bahasa rasmi Borneo Utara, untuk semua tujuan baik pada   peringkat negeri mahupun persekutuan tanpa had tempuh.
Perkara 3: PERLEMBAGAAN

Walaupun perlembagaan Persekutuan Malaya diterima sebagai asas perlembagaan Malaysia, perlembagaan Malaysia hendaklah menjadi dokumen antara negeri dan bukan berbentuk beberapa siri pindaan terhadap perlembagaan yang dipersetujui dalam keadaan yang berlainan sama sekali. perlembagaan baru untuk Borneo Utara sudah tentu perlu.
Perkara 4: KETUA PERSEKUTUAN

Ketua negara Borneo Utara tidak boleh menjadi ketua negara persukutan.
Perkara 5: NAMA PERSEKUTUAN

“Malaysia” bukannya “Melayu Raya”.
Perkara 6: IMIGRESEN

Kawalan kemasukan orang ke mana-mana kawasan di Malaysia dari luar adalah terletak di bawah kuasa kerajaan pusat tetapi kemasukan ke Borneo Utara perlu mendapat kelulusan kerajaan negeri. Kerajaan persekutan tidak boleh menghalang kemasukan orang ke Borneo Utara untuk tujuan kerajaan negeri kecuali atas sebab keselamatan.

Borneo Utara hendaklah mempunyai kuasa yang tidak terbatas bagi mengawal pergerakan orang-orang dari kawasan-kawasan lain di Malaysia ke dalam Borneo Utara, selain daripada yang bekerja dengan kerajaan persekutuan di Borneo Utara.”
Perkara 7: HAK PEMISAH

Tidak harus ada sebarang hak untuk berpisah daripada persekutuan.
Perkara 8: PERBORNEOAN

Pengambilalihan perkhidmatan awam oleh rakyat borneo hendaklah dilaksanakan dengan secepat mungkin.
Perkara 9: PEGAWAI BRITISH

Segala usaha hendaklah dibuat untuk menggalakkan para pegawai British kekal dalam perkhidmatan awam sehingga tempat mereka boleh diambil oleh orang-orang yang layak dari Borneo Utara.
Perkara 10: KEWARGANEGARAAN

Saranan-saranan dalam perengaan 148 (k) laporan suruhanjaya cobbold hendaklah merangkumi hak-hak kewarganegaraan rakyat Borneo Utara dalam persekutuan, tertakluk kepada pindaan-pindaan berikut:

(a) Perenggan kecil (i) tidak harus mengandungi peruntukan menetap selama lima tahun;

(b) Demi menyelaraskannya kepada undang-undang kita, perenggan kecil (ii) (a) hendaklah berbunyi “tujuh daripada sepulah tahun” dan bukannya “lapan daripada dua belas tahun”; dan

(c) Perenggan kecil (iii) seharusnya tidak mengandungi sekatan berhubung dengan kewarganegaraan ibu-bapa – seseorang yang lahir di borneo utara selepas malaysia mestilah menjadi  warganegara persekutuan.
Perkara 11: TARIF DAN KEWANGAN

Borneo utara hendaklah berhak mengawal kewangan tabung pembangunan dan tarifnya sendiri.

Bab12 perkara 12:kedudukan istemewa kaum bumiputera

Pada prinsipnya suku kaum bumiputera di borneo utara hendaklah menikmati hak-hak istemewa seperti yang dinikmati oleh kaum melayu di Malaya, tetapi formula Malaya yang digunakan di Malaya ketika ini tidak semestinya boleh digunakan untuk Borneo Utara.
Perkara 13: KERAJAAN NEGERI

(a) Ketua menteri hendaklah dipilih oleh anggota-anggota majlis perundangan tidak rasmi;
(b) Sistem menteri yang sempurana hendaklah diwujudkan di Borneo Utara.
Perkara14: TEMPOH PERALIHAN

Tempoh peralihan hendaklah diserahkan pada negeri Borneo Utara oleh perlembagaan dan tidak sekadar diamanahkan kepada kerajaan negeri oleh kerajaan persekutuan.
Perkara15: PELAJARAN

Sistem pendidikan yang ada di Borneo Utara sekarang hendaklah dikekalkan dan diletakkan di bawah bidang kuasa kerajaan negeri.
Perkara16: PERLINDUNGAN PERLEMBAGAAN

Kerajaan pusat tidak boleh membuat sebarang pindaan, mengubahsuai atau menarik balik mana-mana perlindungan khas yang telah diberikan kepada Borneo Utara tanpa persetujuan kerajaan Borneo Utara. Kuasa meminda perlembagaan negeri borneo Utara adalah hak mutlak rakyat negeri itu.
Perkara17: PERWAKILAN DALAM PARLIMEN PERSEKUTUAN

Ini hendaklah mengambil kira bukan saja jumlah penduduk Borneo Utara tetapi juga saiz dan potensinya dan dalam apa keadaan pun tidak harus kurang daripada Singapura.
Perkara18: GELARAN KETUA NEGARA

Yang di Pertua Negara
Perkara19: NAMA NEGERI

Sabah
Perkara20: TANAH,HUTAN, KERAJAAN TEMPATAN DAN LAIN-LAIN

Peruntukan dalam perlembagaan persekutuan berhubung dengan kuasa majlis tanah negara tidak harus merangkumi Borneo Utara. Majlis kebangsaan bagi kerajaan tempatan juga tidak harus merangkumi Borneo Utara.

 

Bersatu padu untuk mengambil alih SABAH

Saudaraku Bangsa Tausug

di Sabah

Assalamu alaikum wr wb,

Selamat hari raya Eidul Fitri, semoga anda sekalian dalam lindungan ALLAH SWT dan tentu saja selalu sehat sehingga mampu bekerja dan bekerja untuk kebaikan masa depan anda di Sabah sehingga bermanfaat bagi keluarga yang berada di Sulu, Zamboaga dan lain lain di wilayah Kesultanan Sulu dan Sabah.

Seperti yang anda ketahui, bahwa sesungguhnya anda saat ini tinggal di negeri sendiri yaitu di wilayah kesultanan Sulu dan Sabah ‘ NEGARA BAGIAN SABAH” yang di klaim oleh Malaysia sebagai wilayahnya, namun sesungguhnya malaysia hanyalah sebagai penyewa semata mata.

bahwa namun demikian anda tentu sering mendapatkan perlakukan tidak adil baik yang berhubung kait dengan Identity card, Nationality. kesempatan bekerja dan bersekolah bagi anak anak anda, dan lain sebagainya, bahkan anda sering dianggap s ebagai warga negara kelas 2 di negeri sendiri.

Untuk itu sahabat sahabatku Warga Tausug di Sabah, bersatulah dan dukunglah HM.Sultan Fuada Kiram I didalam upaya mengklaim kembali Sabah dari tangan penyewanya Malaysia. kabarkanlah hal ini kepada seluruh sahabat dan handai taulan anda, agar pada saatnya nanti anda siap membantu baik morel maupun material.

kepada ALLAH jua segalanya dikembalikan